Partner: Emmet Mc Cormack

Haukeland University Hospital (NO)

Ostatnie publikacje
1.Dimcevski G., Kotopoulis S., Bjånes T., Hoem D., Schjøt J., Gjertsen B.T., Biermann M., Molven A., Sorbye H., McCormack E., Postema M., Gilja O.H., A human clinical trial using ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance gemcitabine treatment of inoperable pancreatic cancer, Journal of Controlled Release, ISSN: 0168-3659, DOI: 10.1016/j.jconrel.2016.10.007, Vol.243, pp.172-181, 2016

Streszczenie:

Background:
The primary aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and potential toxicity of gemcitabine combined with microbubbles under sonication in inoperable pancreatic cancer patients. The secondary aim was to evaluate a novel image-guided microbubble-based therapy, based on commercially available technology, towards improving chemotherapeutic efficacy, preserving patient performance status, and prolonging survival.

Methods:
Ten patients were enrolled and treated in this Phase I clinical trial. Gemcitabine was infused intravenously over 30 min. Subsequently, patients were treated using a commercial clinical ultrasound scanner for 31.5 min. SonoVue® was injected intravenously (0.5 ml followed by 5 ml saline every 3.5 min) during the ultrasound treatment with the aim of inducing sonoporation, thus enhancing therapeutic efficacy.

Results:
The combined therapeutic regimen did not induce any additional toxicity or increased frequency of side effects when compared to gemcitabine chemotherapy alone (historical controls). Combination treated patients (n = 10) tolerated an increased number of gemcitabine cycles compared with historical controls (n = 63 patients; average of 8.3 ± 6.0 cycles, versus 13.8 ± 5.6 cycles, p = 0.008, unpaired t-test). In five patients, the maximum tumour diameter was decreased from the first to last treatment. The median survival in our patients (n = 10) was also increased from 8.9 months to 17.6 months (p = 0.011).

Conclusions:
It is possible to combine ultrasound, microbubbles, and chemotherapy in a clinical setting using commercially available equipment with no additional toxicities. This combined treatment may improve the clinical efficacy of gemcitabine, prolong the quality of life, and extend survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Słowa kluczowe:

Ultrasound, Microbubbles, Sonoporation, Pancreatic cancer, Image-guided therapy, Clinical trial

Afiliacje autorów:

Dimcevski G.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Kotopoulis S.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Postema M.-IPPT PAN
Gilja O.H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Bjånes T.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Hoem D.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Schjøt J.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Gjertsen B.T.-University of Bergen (NO)
Biermann M.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Molven A.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Sorbye H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
McCormack E.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
45p.
2.Kotopoulis S., Dimcevski G., McCormack E., Postema M., Gjertsen B.T., Gilja O.H., Ultrasound and microbubble-enhanced chemotherapy for treating pancreatic cancer: a phase I clinical trial, JOURNAL OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, ISSN: 0001-4966, DOI: 10.1121/1.4950209, Vol.139, No.4, abstract, pp.2092, 2016

Streszczenie:

Experimental research of ultrasound to induce or improve delivery has snowballed in the past decade. In our work, we investigate the use of low-intensity ultrasound in combination with clinically approved microbubbles to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Ten voluntary patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were consecutively recruited. Following standard chemotherapy protocol (intravenous infusion of gemcitabine over 30 min), a clinical ultrasoundscanner was targeted at the largest slice of the tumour using modified non-linear contrastimaging settings (1.9 MHz center frequency, 0.27 MPa peak-negative pressure), and SonoVue® was injected intravenously. Ultrasound and microbubble treatment duration was 31.5 min. The combined therapy did not induce any additional toxicity or increase side effect frequency when compared to chemotherapy alone. Combination treated patients were able to tolerate an increased amount treatment cycles when compare historical controls (n = 63); average of 8.3±6.0 cycles, versus 13.8±5.6 cycles. The median survival also increased from 7.0 months to 17.6 months (p = 0.0044). In addition, five patients showed a primary tumor diameter decrease. Combined treatment of ultrasound,microbubbles, and gemcitabine does not increase side effects and may have the potential to increase the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

Afiliacje autorów:

Kotopoulis S.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Dimcevski G.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
McCormack E.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Postema M.-other affiliation
Gjertsen B.T.-University of Bergen (NO)
Gilja O.H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
25p.
3.Kotopoulis S., Delalande A., Popa M., Mamaeva V., Dimcevski G., Gilja O.H., Postema M., Gjertsen B.T., McCormack E., Sonoporation-enhanced chemotherapy significantly reduces primary tumour burden in an orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft, Molecular Imaging and Biology, ISSN: 1536-1632, DOI: 10.1007/s11307-013-0672-5, Vol.16, pp.53-62, 2014

Streszczenie:

Purpose
Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains one of the most lethal human cancers. The high mortality rates associated with this form of cancer are subsequent to late-stage clinical presentation and diagnosis, when surgery is rarely possible and of modest chemotherapeutic impact. Survival rates following diagnosis with advanced pancreatic cancer are very low; typical mortality rates of 50 % are expected within 3 months of diagnosis. However, adjuvant chemotherapy improves the prognosis of patients even after palliative surgery, and successful newer neoadjuvant chemotherapeutical modalities have recently been reported. For patients whose tumours appear unresectable, chemotherapy remains the only option. During the past two decades, the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine has become the first-line chemotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this study, we aim to increase the delivery of gemcitabine to pancreatic tumours by exploring the effect of sonoporation for localised drug delivery of gemcitabine in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

Experimental Design
An orthotopic xenograft mouse model of luciferase expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells was developed, exhibiting disease development similar to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Subsequently, two groups of mice were treated with gemcitabine alone and gemcitabine combined with sonoporation; saline-treated mice were used as a control group. A custom-made focused ultrasound transducer using clinically safe acoustic conditions in combination with SonoVue® ultrasound contrast agent was used to induce sonoporation in the localised region of the primary tumour only. Whole-body disease development was measured using bioluminescence imaging, and primary tumour development was measured using 3D ultrasound.

Results
Following just two treatments combining sonoporation and gemcitabine, primary tumour volumes were significantly lower than control groups. Additional therapy dramatically inhibited primary tumour growth throughout the course of the disease, with median survival increases of up to 10 % demonstrated in comparison to the control groups.

Conclusion
Combined sonoporation and gemcitabine therapy significantly impedes primary tumour development in an orthotopic xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer, suggesting additional clinical benefits for patients treated with gemcitabine in combination with sonoporation.

Słowa kluczowe:

Sonoporation, Pancreatic cancer, Ultrasound, Chemotherapy, 3D ultrasound, Bioluminescence

Afiliacje autorów:

Kotopoulis S.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Delalande A.-CNRS (FR)
Popa M.-KinN Therapeutics (NO)
Mamaeva V.-University of Bergen (NO)
Dimcevski G.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Gilja O.H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Postema M.-other affiliation
Gjertsen B.T.-University of Bergen (NO)
McCormack E.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
30p.
4.Kotopoulis S., Dimcevski G., Gjertsen B.T., Gilja O.H., McCormack E., Postema M., Sonoporation: From the lab to human clinical trials, IEEE INTERNATIONAL ULTRASONICS SYMPOSIUM, DOI: 10.1109/ULTSYM.2014.0208, Vol.1, pp.846-849, 2014

Streszczenie:

Therapeutic ultrasound has been in use for over 70 years but has primarily been a thermal modality. Sonoporation, the use of ultrasound and stable gas microbubbles in the size range of 2-10 μm to form transient pores in cell membranes, has been of great interest in the past 15 years. This technique could be used to improve the delivery of current drugs in very localised regions. There are several phenomena behind sonoporation that all occur non-exclusively: push, pull, jetting, inertial cavitation, shear and, translation. Pre-clinical work has shown that sonoporation can be used to reduce primary tumour burden and inhibit metastatic development. Our clinical trial showed that ultrasound in combination with microbubbles and chemotherapy can effectively double the number of chemotherapy cycles patients can undergo, meaning that the patients were healthier for a longer period of time. Nevertheless, sonoporation is still in its infancy and there is vast room for improvement in both the areas of microbubbles and ultrasound.

Słowa kluczowe:

Sonoporation

Afiliacje autorów:

Kotopoulis S.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Dimcevski G.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Gjertsen B.T.-University of Bergen (NO)
Gilja O.H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
McCormack E.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Postema M.-other affiliation
5.Kotopoulis S., Haugse R., Mujić M., Sulen A., Gullaksen S.E., McCormack E., Gilja O.H., Postema M., Gjertsen B.T., Evaluation of the effects of clinical diagnostic ultrasound in combination with ultrasound contrast agents on cell stress: single cell analysis of intracellular phospho-signaling pathways in blood cancer cells and normal blood leukocytes, IEEE INTERNATIONAL ULTRASONICS SYMPOSIUM, DOI: 10.1109/ULTSYM.2014.0292, Vol.1, pp.1186-1190, 2014

Streszczenie:

Clinical diagnostic ultrasound has been known as one of the safest imaging modalities available, yet very little is known about the cellular response to such acoustic conditions. With the increased interest in therapeutic ultrasound it is becoming ever more important to understand the effects of ultrasound on cells.In our work here we investigate the effect of clinical diagnostic ultrasound on several cell signalling proteins (p38 p-Thr180/p-Tyr182, ERK 1/2 p-Thr202/p-Tyr204 and p53 ac-Lys382) on leukaemia cells (MOLM-13) and monocytes. Our results show that leukaemia cells and monocytes react differently to ultrasound and microbubbles. A relatively small increase in p38 signalling was seen in the leukemic cells, and only at higher intensities in combination with microbubbles. In contrast the monocytes showed an increase in p38 signalling at all acoustic intensities with microbubbles and at the high acoustic intensity without microbubbles. Furthermore, the leukemic cells showed an overall increase in ERK 1/2 signalling whereas the monocytes showed a decrease. These results indicate that the leukaemia cells are less sensitive to stress induced by ultrasound and microbubbles when compared to normal monocytes. In conclusion, our results show that clinical diagnostic ultrasound does have a measurable effect on intracellular signalling but may differ drastically between different cell types. This may affect the conditions necessary for therapeutic ultrasound.

Słowa kluczowe:

Phospho-signaling pathways, Ultrasound contrast agent

Afiliacje autorów:

Kotopoulis S.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Haugse R.-University of Bergen (NO)
Mujić M.-University of Bergen (NO)
Sulen A.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Gullaksen S.E.-University of Bergen (NO)
McCormack E.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Gilja O.H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Postema M.-other affiliation
Gjertsen B.T.-University of Bergen (NO)

Lista rozdziałów w ostatnich monografiach
1.
456
Mujić M., Kotopoulis S., Delalande A., Enger M., Gilja O.H., McCormack E., Postema M., Gjertsen B.T., Micro-acoustics in marine and medical research, rozdział: Flow cytometic characterization and sorting of ultrasound contrast agents, pp.171-183, 2012

Abstrakty konferencyjne
1.Dimcevski G.G., Kotopoulis S., Bjåne T., Hoem D., Schjött J., Gjertsen B.T., Biermann M., Molven A., Sorbye H., McCormack E., Postema M., Gilja O.H., Ultrasound and microbubble enhanced treatment of inoperable pancreatic adeonocarcinoma, ASCO Annual Meeting, 2016-06-03/06-07, Chicago (US), Vol.34, No.suppl; abstr e15703, pp.1, 2016

Streszczenie:

Background: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the most lethal human cancers. Surgery is often unfeasible, and the tumors respond poorly to radiation or chemotherapeutic drugs. Consequently, pancreatic cancer represents a huge burden to society and the need for new therapeutic options is evident. Experimental research using ultrasound to improve therapeutic delivery has soared in the past decade. We aimed toevaluate the safety and potential toxicity of gemcitabine combined with microbubbles under sonication in inoperable pancreatic cancer patients. The secondary goal was to develop a novel image-guided microbubble-based therapy, based on commercially available technology, towards improving chemotherapeutic efficacy, preserving patient performance grade, and prolongation of survival. Methods: Ten patients were enrolled and treated in this Phase I clinical trial. Gemcitabine was infused intravenously over 30 min. Subsequently patients were treated using a commercial clinical ultrasound scanner for 31.5 min. SonoVue was injected intravenously (0.5 ml followed by 5 ml saline every 3.5 min) during the ultrasound treatment with the aim of enhancing therapeutic efficacy. Results: The combined therapeutic regimen did not induce any additional toxicity or increase side effect frequency when compared to gemcitabine chemotherapy alone (historical controls). Combination treated patients (n = 10) tolerated an increased number of gemcitabine cycles compared with historical controls (n = 63 patients; average of 8.3±6.0 cycles, versus 13.8±5.6 cycles). In five patients, the maximum tumor diameter was decreased during treatment. The median survival in our patients was also increased from 7.0 months to 17.6 months (p = 0.0044). Conclusions: We perform the first-in-human study evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of ultrasound and microbubble enhanced chemotherapy. It is possible to combine ultrasound, microbubbles, and chemotherapy in a clinical setting with no additional toxicity. This combined treatment may improve the clinical efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents, prolong the quality of life, and extend survival in patients with PDAC. Clinical trial information: NCT01674556.

Afiliacje autorów:

Dimcevski G.G.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Kotopoulis S.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Postema M.-other affiliation
Gilja O.H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Bjåne T.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Hoem D.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Schjött J.-other affiliation
Gjertsen B.T.-University of Bergen (NO)
Biermann M.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Molven A.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
Sorbye H.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
McCormack E.-Haukeland University Hospital (NO)
2.Dimcevski G., Kotopoulis S., Hoem D., Postema M., Gjertsen B.T., Bjåne T.K., Biermann M., McCormack E., Sorbye H., Molven A., Gilja O.H., Ultrasound-assisted treatment of an inoperable pancreatic cancer, MedViz Conference 2013, 2013/, Bergen (NO), pp.49-52, 2013
3.Kotopoulis S., Delalande A., Popa M., Dimcevski G., Gilja O.H., Postema M., Gjertsen B.T., McCormack E., Ultrasound and microbubble enhanced therapy of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer in mice, MedViz Conference 2013, 2013/, Bergen (NO), pp.45-47, 2013