Partner: Jacek Miękisz

University of Warsaw (PL)

Ostatnie publikacje
1.Nałęcz-Jawecki P., Szymańska P., Kochańczyk M., Miękisz J., Lipniacki T., Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles, JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS, ISSN: 0021-9606, DOI: 10.1063/1.4936131, Vol.143, No.21, pp.215102-1-12, 2015

Streszczenie:

Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme–substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

Słowa kluczowe:

Enzymes, Enzyme kinetics, Diffusion, Reaction rate constants, Membrane biochemistry

Afiliacje autorów:

Nałęcz-Jawecki P.-University of Warsaw (PL)
Szymańska P.-University of Warsaw (PL)
Kochańczyk M.-IPPT PAN
Miękisz J.-University of Warsaw (PL)
Lipniacki T.-IPPT PAN
35p.
2.Szymańska P., Kochańczyk M., Miękisz J., Lipniacki T., Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles, PHYSICAL REVIEW E, ISSN: 1539-3755, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.022702, Vol.91, pp.022702-1-15, 2015

Streszczenie:

We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

Afiliacje autorów:

Szymańska P.-University of Warsaw (PL)
Kochańczyk M.-IPPT PAN
Miękisz J.-University of Warsaw (PL)
Lipniacki T.-IPPT PAN
35p.
3.Komorowski M., Miękisz J., Stumpf M.P.H., Decomposing Noise in Biochemical Signalling Systems Highlights the Role of Protein Degradation, BIOPHYSICAL JOURNAL, ISSN: 0006-3495, DOI: 10.1016/j.bpj.2013.02.027, Vol.104, pp.1783-1793, 2013

Streszczenie:

Stochasticity is an essential aspect of biochemical processes at the cellular level. We now know that living cells take advantage of stochasticity in some cases and counteract stochastic effects in others. Here we propose a method that allows us to calculate contributions of individual reactions to the total variability of a system’s output. We demonstrate that reactions differ significantly in their relative impact on the total noise and we illustrate the importance of protein degradation on the overall variability for a range of molecular processes and signaling systems. With our flexible and generally applicable noise decomposition method, we are able to shed new, to our knowledge, light on the sources and propagation of noise in biochemical reaction networks; in particular, we are able to show how regulated protein degradation can be employed to reduce the noise in biochemical systems.

Afiliacje autorów:

Komorowski M.-IPPT PAN
Miękisz J.-University of Warsaw (PL)
Stumpf M.P.H.-Imperial College London (GB)
35p.