Tabela A z publikacjami w czasopismach wyróżnionych w Journal Citation Reports (JCR) 
Tabela B z publikacjami w czasopismach zagranicznych i krajowych, wyróżnionych na liście MNSzW
Publikacje konferencyjne indeksowane w bazie Web of Science Core Collection
Inne publikacje w pozostałych czasopismach i wydawnictwach konferencyjnych
Afiliacja IPPT PAN

1.Kowalewski P.K., Olszewski R., Walędziak M.S., Janik M.R., Kwiatkowski A., Gałązka-Świderek N., Cichoń K., Brągoszewski J., Paśnik K., Long-Term Outcomes of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy—a Single-Center, Retrospective Study , Obesity Surgery, ISSN: 0960-8923, DOI: 10.1007/s11695-017-2795-2, pp.1-5, 2017
Kowalewski P.K., Olszewski R., Walędziak M.S., Janik M.R., Kwiatkowski A., Gałązka-Świderek N., Cichoń K., Brągoszewski J., Paśnik K., Long-Term Outcomes of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy—a Single-Center, Retrospective Study , Obesity Surgery, ISSN: 0960-8923, DOI: 10.1007/s11695-017-2795-2, pp.1-5, 2017

Abstract:
Introduction Sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is one of the most
popular bariatric procedures. We present our long-term results
regarding weight loss, comorbidities, and gastric reflux
disease.
Material and Methods We identified patients who underwent
LSG in our institution between 2006 and 2009. We revised the
data, and the patients with outdated contact details were
tracked with the national health insurance database and social
media (facebook). Each of the identified patients was asked to
complete an online or telephone survey covering, among
others, their weight and comorbidities. On that basis, we calculated
the percent total weight loss (%TWL) and percent
excess weight loss (%EWL), along with changes in body mass
index (ΔBMI). Satisfactory weight loss was set at >50% EWL
(for BMI = 25 kg/m2
). We evaluated type 2 diabetes (T2DM)
and arterial hypertension (AHT) based on the pharmacological
therapy. GERD presence was evaluated by the typical
symptoms and/or proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy.
Results One hundred twenty-seven patients underwent LSG
between 2006 and 2009. One hundred twenty patients were
qualified for this study. Follow-up data was available for 100
participants (47 female, 53 male). Median follow-up period
reached 8.0 years (from 7.1 to 10.7). Median BMI upon qualification
for LSG was 51.6 kg/m2
. Sixteen percent of patients
required revisional surgery over the years (RS group), mainly
because of insufficient weight loss (14 Roux-Y gastric bypass—LRYGB;
one mini gastric bypass, one gastric banding).
For the LSG (LSG group n = 84), the mean %EWL was
51.1% (±22.3), median %TWL was 23.5% (IQR 17.7–
33.3%), and median ΔBMI was 12.1 kg/m2 (IQR 8.2–17.2).
Fifty percent (n = 42) of patients achieved the satisfactory
%EWL of 50%. For RS group, the mean %EWL was 57.8%
(±18.2%) and median %TWL reached 33% (IQR 27.7–
37.9%). Sixty-two percent (n = 10) achieved the satisfactory
weight loss. Fifty-nine percent of patients reported improvement
in AHT therapy, 58% in T2DM. After LSG, 60%
(n = 60) of patients reported recurring GERD symptoms and
44% were treated with proton pomp inhibitors (PPI). In 93%
of these cases, GERD has developed de novo.
Conclusions Isolated LSG provides fairly good effects in a
long-term follow-up with mean %EWL at 51.1%. Sixteen
percent of patients require additional surgery due to insufficient
weight loss. More than half of the subjects observe improvement
in AHT and T2DM. Over half of the patients complain
of GERD symptoms, which in most of the cases is a de
novo complaint.

Keywords:
Bariatricsurgery, Sleeve, Long-termfollow-up, Comorbidities, GERD

(40p.)
2.Trots I., Nowicki A., Postema M., Ultrasound Image Improvement by Code Bit Elongation, IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS, ISSN: 1070-9908, DOI: 10.1109/LSP.2017.2776040, pp.1-5, 2017
Trots I., Nowicki A., Postema M., Ultrasound Image Improvement by Code Bit Elongation, IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS, ISSN: 1070-9908, DOI: 10.1109/LSP.2017.2776040, pp.1-5, 2017

Abstract:
This paper analyses the influence of the transducer bandwidth on the compression and the axial resolution of an ultrasound image. The distortion of an electrical signal visible in the final image is a major problem in ultrasonography. To solve this problem, the bit length in Golay-complementary sequences was elongated, narrowing the fractional bandwidth of the coded sequences. Therefore, more energy of the burst signal could be transferred through the ultrasound transducer. The experimental results obtained for transmission of the complementary Golay-coded sequences with two different bit lengths - one-cycle and two-cycles - have been compared, and the efficiency of the pulse compression and its influence on the axial resolution for two fractional bandwidths have been discussed. The results are presented for two transducers having a fractional bandwidth of 25% and 80% and operating at a 6-MHz frequency. The results obtained show that the elongation of the Golay single bit length (doubled in our case) compensate for the limited transducer bandwidth. 2D ultrasound images of a tissue-mimicking phantom are presented and demonstrate the benefits of the use of two-cycle bit length.

Keywords:
Coded excitation, Golay sequences, synthetic aperture method, transducer bandwidth, ultrasound imaging

(40p.)
3.Piotrzkowska-Wróblewska H., Dobruch-Sobczak K., Byra M., Nowicki A., Open access database of raw ultrasonic signals acquired from malignant and benign breast lesions, Medical Physics, ISSN: 0094-2405, DOI: 10.1002/mp.12538, Vol.44, No.9, pp.1-5, 2017
Piotrzkowska-Wróblewska H., Dobruch-Sobczak K., Byra M., Nowicki A., Open access database of raw ultrasonic signals acquired from malignant and benign breast lesions, Medical Physics, ISSN: 0094-2405, DOI: 10.1002/mp.12538, Vol.44, No.9, pp.1-5, 2017

Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of this paper is to provide access to a database consisting of the raw radio-frequency ultrasonic echoes acquired from malignant and benign breast lesions. The database is freely available for study and signal analysis.
Acquisition and validation methods: The ultrasonic radio-frequency echoes were recorded from breast focal lesions of patients of the Institute of Oncology in Warsaw. The data were collected between 11/2013 and 10/2015. Patients were examined by a radiologist with 18 yr’ experience in the ultrasonic examination of breast lesions. The set of data includes scans from 52 malignant and 48 benign breast lesions recorded in a group of 78 women. For each lesion, two individual orthogonal scans from the pathological region were acquired with the Ultrasonix SonixTouch Research ultrasound scanner using the L14-5/38 linear array transducer. All malignant lesions were histologically assessed by core needle biopsy. In the case of benign lesions, part of them was histologically assessed and another part was observed over a 2-year period. Data format and usage notes: The radio-frequency echoes were stored in Matlab file format. For each scan, the region of interest was provided to correctly indicate the lesion area. Moreover, for each lesion, the BI-RADS category and the lesion class were included. Two code examples of data manipulation are presented. The data can be downloaded via the Zenodo repository (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.545928) or the website http ://bluebox.ippt.gov.pl/~hpiotrzk.
Potential applications: The database can be used to test quantitative ultrasound techniques and ultrasound image processing algorithms, or to develop computer-aided diagno sis systems.

Keywords:
breast lesions, dataset, ultrasonic signals, ultrasonography

(35p.)
4.Gluba-Brzózka A., Franczyk B., Olszewski R., Banach M., Rysz J., Personalized Medicine: New Perspectives for the Diagnosis and the Treatment of Renal Diseases, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN: 1422-0067, DOI: 10.3390/ijms18061248, Vol.18, No.1248, pp.1-20, 2017
Gluba-Brzózka A., Franczyk B., Olszewski R., Banach M., Rysz J., Personalized Medicine: New Perspectives for the Diagnosis and the Treatment of Renal Diseases, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN: 1422-0067, DOI: 10.3390/ijms18061248, Vol.18, No.1248, pp.1-20, 2017

Abstract:
The prevalence of renal diseases is rising and reaching 5–15% of the adult population. Renal damage is associated with disturbances of body homeostasis and the loss of equilibrium between exogenous and endogenous elements including drugs and metabolites. Studies indicate that renal diseases are influenced not only by environmental but also by genetic factors. In some cases the disease is caused by mutation in a single gene and at that time severity depends on the presence of one or two utated alleles. In other cases, renal disease is associated with the presence of alteration within a gene or genes, but environmental factors are also necessary for the development of disease. Therefore, it seems that the analysis of genetic aspects should be a natural component of clinical and xperimental studies. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine the right drug,for the right patient,at the right time. Whole-genome examinations may help to change the approach to the disease and the patient resulting in the creation of“personalized medicine”with new diagnostic and treatment strategies designed on the basis of genetic background of each individual. The identification of high-risk patients in pharmacogenomics analyses will help to avoid many unwarranted side effects while optimizing treatment efficacy for individual patients. Personalized therapies for kidney diseases are still at the preliminary stage mainly due to high costs of such analyses and the complex nature of human genome. This review will focus on several areas of interest: renal disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rate of progression and the prediction ofprognosis.

Keywords:
renal diseases; personalized medicine;treatment;diagnosis;biomarkers

(30p.)
5.Żołek N., Ranachowski Z., Ranachowski P., Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka D., Kúdela Jr S., Dvorak T., Statistical assessment of the microstructure of barite aggregate from different deposits using x-ray microtomography and optical microscopy, ARCHIVES OF METALLURGY AND MATERIALS, ISSN: 1733-3490, DOI: 10.1515/amm-2017-0104, Vol.62, No.2, pp.697-702, 2017
Żołek N., Ranachowski Z., Ranachowski P., Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka D., Kúdela Jr S., Dvorak T., Statistical assessment of the microstructure of barite aggregate from different deposits using x-ray microtomography and optical microscopy, ARCHIVES OF METALLURGY AND MATERIALS, ISSN: 1733-3490, DOI: 10.1515/amm-2017-0104, Vol.62, No.2, pp.697-702, 2017

Abstract:
Two different barite ore (barium sulfate BaSO4) specimens from different localizations were tested and described in this paper. Analysis of the microstructure was performed on polished sections, and on thin sections using X-ray microtomography (micro-CT), and optical microscopy (MO). Microtomography allowed obtaining three-dimensional images of the barite aggregate specimens. In the tomograms, the spatial distribution of the other polluting phases, empty space as well as cracks, pores, and voids – that exceeded ten micrometers of diameter-were possible to visualize. Also, the micro-CT allowed distinguishing between minerals of different density, like SiO2 and BaSO4. Images obtained and analyzed on thin sections with various methods using the optical microscopy in transmitted light delivered additional information on the aggregate microstructure, i.e. allow for estimation of the different kinds of inclusions (like the different density of the minerals) in the investigated specimens. Above methods, which were used in the tests, completed each another in order to supply a set of information on inclusions’ distribution and to present the important differences of the barite aggregate specimens microstructure.

Keywords:
barite ore, barite aggregate, microstructure, optical microscopy, thin sections analysis, X-ray tomography

(30p.)
6.Secomski W., Bilmin K., Kujawska T., Nowicki A., Grieb P., Lewin P.A., In vitro ultrasound experiments: Standing wave and multiple reflections influence on the outcome, Ultrasonics, ISSN: 0041-624X, DOI: 10.1016/j.ultras.2017.02.008, Vol.77, pp.203-213, 2017
Secomski W., Bilmin K., Kujawska T., Nowicki A., Grieb P., Lewin P.A., In vitro ultrasound experiments: Standing wave and multiple reflections influence on the outcome, Ultrasonics, ISSN: 0041-624X, DOI: 10.1016/j.ultras.2017.02.008, Vol.77, pp.203-213, 2017

Abstract:
The purpose of this work was to determine the influence of standing waves and possible multiple reflections under the conditions often encountered in examining the effects of ultrasound exposure on the cell cultures in vitro. More specifically, the goal was to quantitatively ascertain the influence of ultrasound exposure under free field (FF) and standing waves (SW) and multiple reflections (MR) conditions (SWMR) on the biological endpoint (50% cell necrosis). Such information would help in designing the experiments, in which the geometry of the container with biological tissue may prevent FF conditions to be established and in which the ultrasound generated temperature elevation is undesirable. This goal was accomplished by performing systematic, side-by-side experiments in vitro with C6 rat glioma cancer cells using 12 well and 96 well plates. It was determined that to obtain 50% of cell viability using the 12 well plates, the spatial average, temporal average (ISATA) intensities of 0.32 W/cm2 and 5.89 W/cm2 were needed under SWMR and FF conditions, respectively. For 96 well plates the results were 0.80 W/cm2 and 2.86 W/cm2 respectively. The corresponding, hydrophone measured pRMS maximum pressure amplitude values, were 0.71 MPa, 0.75 MPa, 0.75 MPa and 0.73 MPa, respectively. These results suggest that pRMS pressure amplitude was independent of the measurement set-up geometry and hence could be used to predict the cells’ mortality threshold under any in vitro experimental conditions or even as a starting point for (pre-clinical) in vivo tests. The described procedure of the hydrophone measurements of the pRMS maximum pressure amplitude at the k/2 distance (here 0.75 mm) from the cell’s level at the bottom of the dish or plate provides the guideline allowing the difference between the FF and SWMR conditions to be determined in any experimental setup. The outcome of the measurements also indicates that SWMR exposure might be useful at any ultrasound assisted therapy experiments as it permits to reduce thermal effects. Although the results presented are valid for the experimental conditions used in this study they can be generalized. The analysis developed provides methodology facilitating independent laboratories to determine their specific ultrasound exposure parameters for a given biological end-point under standing waves and multiple reflections conditions. The analysis also permits verification of the outcome of the experiments mimicking pre- and clinical environment between different, unaffiliated teams of researchers.

Keywords:
Standing wave, Ultrasound pressure, Ultrasound intensity, C6 glioma, Anticancer therapy, Sonodynamic therapy, Ultrasound bio-effects

(30p.)
7.Dobruch-Sobczak K., Piotrzkowska-Wróblewska H., Roszkowska-Purska K., Nowicki A., Jakubowski W., Usefulness of combined BI-RADS analysis and Nakagami statistics of ultrasound echoes in the diagnosis of breast lesions, Clinical Radiology, ISSN: 0009-9260, DOI: 10.1016/j.crad.2016.11.009, Vol.72, pp.339.e7-339.e15, 2017
Dobruch-Sobczak K., Piotrzkowska-Wróblewska H., Roszkowska-Purska K., Nowicki A., Jakubowski W., Usefulness of combined BI-RADS analysis and Nakagami statistics of ultrasound echoes in the diagnosis of breast lesions, Clinical Radiology, ISSN: 0009-9260, DOI: 10.1016/j.crad.2016.11.009, Vol.72, pp.339.e7-339.e15, 2017

Abstract:
AIM: To develop a method combining the statistics of the ultrasound backscatter and the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification to enhance the differentiation of breast tumours.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Nakagami shape parameter m was used to characterise the scatter properties of breast tumours. Raw data from the radiofrequency (RF) echo-signal and Bmode images from 107 (32 malignant and 75 benign) lesions and their surrounding tissue were recorded. Three different characteristic values of the shape parameters of m (maximum [mLmax], minimum [mLmin] and average [mLavg]) and differences between m parameters (Dmmax, Dmmin, Dmavg) of the lesions and their surrounding tissues were assessed. A lesion with a BI-RADS score of 3 was considered benign, while a lesion with a score of 4 was considered malignant (a cut-off of BI-RADS 3/4 was set for all patients).
RESULTS: The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was equal to 0.966 for BI-RADS, with 100% sensitivity and 54.67% specificity. All malignant lesions were diagnosed correctly, whereas 34 benign lesions were biopsied unnecessarily. In assessing the Nakagami statistics, the sum of the sensitivity and specificity was the best for mLavg (62.5% and 93.33%, respectively). Only four of 20 lesions were found over the cut-off value in BI-RADS of 4a. When comparing the differences in m parameters, Dmavg had the highest sensitivity of 90% (only three of 32 lesions were false negative). These three lesions were classified as BIRADS category 4c. The combined use of B-mode and mLmin parameter improve the AUC up to 0.978 (pĽ0.088), compared to BI-RADS alone.
CONCLUSION: The combination of the parametric imaging and the BI-RADS assessment does not significantly improve the differentiation of breast lesions, but it has the potential to better identify the group of patients with mainly benign lesions that have a low level of suspicion for malignancy with a BI-RADS score of 4a.

(25p.)
8.Wilczek M.M., Olszewski R., Krupienicz A., Trans -Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Urgent Need for Legislation , CARDIOLOGY, ISSN: 0008-6312, DOI: 10.1159/000479956 , Vol.138, No.4, pp.254-258, 2017
Wilczek M.M., Olszewski R., Krupienicz A., Trans -Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Urgent Need for Legislation , CARDIOLOGY, ISSN: 0008-6312, DOI: 10.1159/000479956 , Vol.138, No.4, pp.254-258, 2017

Abstract:
Hydrogenated oils containing trans -fatty acids (TFA) are used to produce margarine and various processed foods. TFA affect serum lipid levels, fatty acid metabolism, and endothelial function. High TFA intake is linked to increased allcause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. Denmark was the first country to introduce a law that limited TFA content in food; this action led to lower CVD mortality. So far 7 European countries have followed this practice, in a few others the food industry voluntarily reduced TFA use. The issue remains mostly unaddressed in the rest of the world. Legal TFA limits should be commonly established as they are the optimal solution considering both CVD prevention and the associated cost savings in public healthcare.

Keywords:
Trans -fatty acids, Cardiovascular disease, Nutrition policy

(25p.)
9.Byra M., Kruglenko E., Gambin B., Nowicki A., Temperature Monitoring during Focused Ultrasound Treatment by Means of the Homodyned K Distribution, ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA A, ISSN: 0587-4246, DOI: 10.12693/APhysPolA.131.1525, Vol.131, No.6, pp.1525-1528, 2017
Byra M., Kruglenko E., Gambin B., Nowicki A., Temperature Monitoring during Focused Ultrasound Treatment by Means of the Homodyned K Distribution, ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA A, ISSN: 0587-4246, DOI: 10.12693/APhysPolA.131.1525, Vol.131, No.6, pp.1525-1528, 2017

Abstract:
Temperature monitoring is essential for various medical treatments. In this work, we investigate the impact of temperature on backscattered ultrasound echo statistics during a high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. A tissue mimicking phantom was heated with a spherical ultrasonic transducer up to 56 _C in order to imitate tissue necrosis. During the heating, an imaging scanner was used to acquire backscattered echoes from the heated region. These data was then modeled with the homodyned K distribution. We found that the best temperature indicator can be obtained by combining two parameters of the model, namely the backscattered echo mean intensity and the effective number of scatterers per resolution cell. Next, ultrasonic thermometer was designed and used to create a map of the temperature induced within the tissue phantom during the treatment

Keywords:
Temperature monitoring, homodyned K distribution, focused ultrasound

(15p.)
10.Johansen K., Kimmel E., Postema M., Theory of Red Blood Cell Oscillations in an Ultrasound Field, ARCHIVES OF ACOUSTICS, ISSN: 0137-5075, DOI: 10.1515/aoa-2017-0013, Vol.42, No.1, pp.121-126, 2017
Johansen K., Kimmel E., Postema M., Theory of Red Blood Cell Oscillations in an Ultrasound Field, ARCHIVES OF ACOUSTICS, ISSN: 0137-5075, DOI: 10.1515/aoa-2017-0013, Vol.42, No.1, pp.121-126, 2017

Abstract:
Manipulating particles in the blood pool with noninvasive methods has been of great interest in therapeutic delivery. Recently, it was demonstrated experimentally that red blood cells can be forced to translate and accumulate in an ultrasound field. This acoustic response of the red blood cells has been attributed to sonophores, gas pockets that are formed under the influence of a sound field in the inner-membrane leaflets of biological cells. In this paper, we propose a simpler model: that of the compressible membrane. We derive the spatio-temporal cel dynamics for a spherically symmetric single cell, whilst regarding the cell bilayer membrane as two monolayer Newtonian viscous liquids, separated by a thin gas void.
When applying the newly-derived equations to a red blood cell, it is observed that the void inside the bilayer expands to multiples of its original thickness, even at clinically safe acoustic pressure amplitudes. For causing permanent cell rupture during expansion, however, the acoustic pressure amplitudes needed would have to surpass the inertial cavitation threshold by a factor 10. Given the incompressibility of the inner monolayer, the radial oscillations of a cell are governed by the same set of equations as those of a forced antibubble. Evidently, these equations must hold for liposomes under sonication, as well.

Keywords:
Spatio-temporal cell dynamics, Rayleigh-Plesset equation, spherical cell, red blood cell, erythrocyte

(15p.)